Thursday, July 10, 2014

IMAM AL GHAZALI: FATHER of MODERN-TALIBANISM?

WOMEN ..
and MEN ...


(a summary below shared with me)
here's what the Islamic scholar Imam Al Ghazali said about women. I hope scholars out there would care to comment. And I hope women should debunk Al Ghazali and denounce his views ...



" ... Al-Ghazali is considered to be the greatest Muslim scholar ever. He is called “The Defender of Islam”. He has written around 1,000 books in the Fiqah of The Islamic Human Rights Commission .
In his well-renown Book, “The Revival Of The Religious Sciences” Al-Ghazali defines women role:
- She should stay at home and get on with her spinning
- She can go out only in emergencies
- She must not be well-informed nor must she be communicative with her neighbors and only visit them when absolutely necessary
- She should take care of her husband and respect him in his presence and his absence and seek to satisfy him in everything
- She must not leave her house without his permission and if given his permission she must leave secretly
- She should put on old clothes and take deserted streets and alleys, avoid markets, and make sure that a stranger does not hear her voice, her footsteps, smell her or recognize her
- She must not speak to a friend of her husband even in need
- Her sole worry should be her “al bud” (reproductive organs) her home as well as her prayers and her fast (starvation for Allah)
- If a friend of her husband calls when her husband is absent she must not open the door nor reply to him in order to safeguard her “al bud” (vagina)
- She should accept what her husband gives her as sufficient sexual needs at any moment
- She should be clean and ready to satisfy her husband’s sexual needs at any moment
The great theologian then warns all men to be careful of women for their “guile is immense and their mischief is noxious; they are immoral and mean spirited”.Like a true Muslim cleric Ghazali states “It is a fact that all the trials, misfortunes and woes which befall men come from women” [3.2]
In his Book “Counsel for Kings,” Ghazali sums up all that a woman has to endure because of Eve’s misbehavior in the Garden of Eden:
“When Eve ate fruit which He had forbidden to her from the tree in Paradise, the Lord, be He praised, cursed women with eighteen punishments:
- menstruation
- childbirth
- separation from mother and father and marriage to a stranger
- pregnancy
- not having control over her own person
- a lesser share in inheritance; (one half of the male as per the Quran)
- her liability to be divorced and inability to divorce
- its being lawful for men to have four wives, but for a woman to have only one husband
- the fact that she must stay secluded in the house
- the fact that she must keep her head covered inside the house
- the fact that two women’s testimony has to be set against the testimony of one man
- the fact that she must not go out of the house unless accompanied by a near relative
- the fact that men take part in Friday and feast day prayers and funerals while women do
not
- disqualification for leadership and judgeship
- the fact that merit has one thousand components, only one of which is attributable to women, while 999 are attributable to men
- the fact that if women are profligate they will be given twice as much torment as the rest of the community at the Resurrection Day
- the fact that if their husbands die they must observe a waiting period of four months and ten days before remarrying
The idea that a woman’s sole purpose and “duty is to stay at home to satisfy the sexual appetite of her husband” is again summed up in Ghazali’s Book “Proof Of Islam.” Ghazali is still so highly revered amongst the majority of Muslim clerics that that he is called “Proof of Islam”. The most influential thinker of Islam, Ghazali, molded the minds of billions of Muslims with his opinions on women’s character :
“If you relax the woman’s leash a tiny bit, she will take you and bolt wildly….
Their deception is awesome and their wickedness is contagious; bad character and feeble mind are their predominant traits …”
Ghazali also exhorted women: A wife should never refuse her bud (vagina) to her husband even if it is on the saddle of a camel
Al-Gazali urged those men who teach their women to write : “Do not add evil to unhappiness” learning his lessons from his prophet Muhammad and caliph Omar Ibn al-Khattab who commanded :“Prevent women from learning to write, adopt positions
opposite those of women. There is great virtue in such opposition.”
As the supreme cleric Ghazali defined marriage for generations of Muslims :
“Marriage is a form of slavery. The woman is man’s slave and her duty therefore is absolute obedience to the husband in all that he asks of her person. A woman, who at the moment of death enjoys the full approval of her husband, will find her place in Paradise.”

MY NOTES:

WHY WE MUST ALSO DEBUNK
Imam Al Ghazali ...

" ... As long as these philosophers and scholars produce opinions that are not in line with modern conception of human rights and liberalism, they ought to be critiqued and criticized. Plato and Aristotle are still criticized till today; their view of society and ethics critiqued as a precursor of totalitarianism, Al Ghazali may produce helpful conceptions of society and the "resuscitation/revival of religion" (Ihya Ulumuddin) but his work on the "Incoherence of the Philosophers" was heavily criticized by Al Arabi the Spanish scholar who wrote a beautiful thesis on the self and a "transcultural Quran" in "Bezels of Wisdom,". Even the Quran ought to be reviewed for its "borrowed contents" from older sources. The stories of creation, the prophets, and of ecumenical historiograhy are not original; they have been told in more extensive versions even as early as in the Zen Avesta of Zarathustra. The problem is that we revere religious texts so much we have forgotten to ask "Who is the Author" as the French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau would ask, or as a modern semiotician Mikhail Bakhtin would also inquire. In the end we leave these text to be the "monopoly of truths of clerics, priests, pandits, preachers, etc." And next, we wonder why the Global Khalifah Movement come into being, and we fear the consequences. No-- we must also see where knowledge come from re:the matrix of power/knowledge. -- ar

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Farouq Omaro says: I have never considered Al Ghazali as an authoritative figure in Islam. I prefer the teachings of Ibnu Rushd, Ibnu Arabi, Haji Vali Bektash, Bayazid Bastami and Mansur al Hallaj. Ghazali, Hanafi, Hanbali, Shafi, Bukhari all changed the face of Islam! Well, just my opinion.

kampong lad said...

salam sdr azly.

al-ghazali 1058-1111ad
al-arabi 1165-1240ad

question: how did arabi conclude and prove that all those came from ghazali. did the former have the opportunity to meet the latter in person and witness the writing process? you need a standard verification to prove genuineness of thing, e.g. a specimen signature is required to prove that the cheque is signed by the account holder. pls enlighten, tq.

MJ said...

i prefer the Sufi masters who are drunk in love, only love and nothing else than love......

bidyut chatterjee said...

I feel horrified

Aseem Choudhury said...

Ghazali must have been a pervert and a satanic insane. I say that because all the things that he says about women can only be said by a demented mad man, possessed by the devil himself. All the 1000 books that he is said to have authored should be collected and burnt at a public square in whichever desert town he lived with his camels.

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