Sunday, July 19, 2009

Malaysia no longer "Tanah Melayu"




It is the year 2009, 40 years after the May 13 1969 tragedy.

Because we have agreed to become a country rooted in a social contract that ought to give equality, equity, and equal opportunity to all who have given up their natural rights in exchange for "citizenship" and the rights of the State to tax them (with or without representation), we must recognize that Malaysia is for Malaysians.

This will be the most humane perspective we ought to work towards in holding. What is needed is a system of check and balance that will ensure that each generation of Malaysians will progress without the trappings of mistrust, hatred, and institutionalized racism.

But first, we must all fight for the installation of this reality. Political will that will move this agenda of ethical liberalism must be harnessed and be made the driving force for social, cultural, educational, and psychological change.

The idea of "Tanah Melayu" must be reflected upon -- of its relevancy and whether it is a kind of ideological thinking that will help develop a culture of peace or help nurture inter-racial hatred.

Communal politics is an old school thinking that cannot survive the wave of cosmopolitanism; just like the any idea that could not survive the inevitability of historical change propelled by changes in material condition and consciousness.

In Malaysia, the days of communal politics is numbered, however well it is packaged and propagandized. Multiculturalism, and in fact radical multiculturalism, or better still, radical marhaenism is the next wave. Institutions that promote racism must be deconstructed and abolished; institutions that are funded by the ruling regime to ensure the hegemony of this or that race. Dismantle them before they become yet another layer of complexity in our consciousness; a layer that hides the structural violence inherent in a system of racism and false consciousness called "nationalistic history".

The only permanent thing is change, as the Chinese philosopher and mystic Lao Tzu said. Man has no nature, what he has is history, said the Spanish philosopher Ortega Gasset.

And there will be beauty in this change if we know how to destroy the beast within.

GOOD PROPAGANDA SONG FROM THE 1970s:

8 comments:

T H E . M A L A Y . P R E S S said...

"Because we have agreed to become a country rooted in a social contract that ought to give equality..."

It was not WE..it was HIS...

Anonymous said...

We do not call USA the land of Red Indians. But to me it's not the social contract. It' how certain people treat the whole Malaysia as their own property without regard of others.

malayamuda said...

and the trains.........it was Malayan Railway before independance and after independance it became Keretapi Tanah Melayu............should it not be Malaysian Railways now ?

Anonymous said...

It will be good to see a Malaysian Malaysia indeed. But... aren't you guys like 44 years late to the party?

Tamerlane said...

Malaysia is for Malaysians but Malays have special priviledges.

Anonymous said...

The deal made was that the non-malay get a citizenship and must respect the special privileges that was given to the malays (and then bumi after sabah and sarawak joins malaysia).

Is it so hard to comply?

If you dont want to comply, then perhaps those non-malays should get a citizenship somewhere else where they can get the same and equal rights as the origins there.

How can we produce a 1Malaysia (satu negara bangsa where all people are under bangsa Malaysia) when there are people who cant comply to the basic perlembagaan malaysia?.

Integration is the most realistic way to ensure peace in malaysia. As the non-Malays shout for equal rights (meaning changing the perlembagaan Malaysia), there are also Malays who shout remove their (non Malay) rights like what is stated in the perlembagaan.

Every house has its own set of rules. If you dont like it, you may leave the house.

Anonymous said...

The deal made was that the non-malay get a citizenship and must respect the special privileges that was given to the malays (and then bumi after sabah and sarawak joins malaysia).

Is it so hard to comply?

Actually, yes it is so difficult to comply. These terms were accepted by our 'forefathers' and i was no party to it.

If it was only for the 'originals' who were here before us, than it would not have been so difficult. But now when you hear about 'foreigners' being offered citizenship and bumiputra status just on account of their religion makes it even more difficult for us.

I wonder how you would feel if the situation was reversed? Just think about it.

Malaysia is my home. I have nowhere else to go. Therefore I desire change to make this country one that is fair and just to all it's citizens.

Anonymous said...

samy vellu says correct , correct , correct

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